Field Trips Anywhere
CHO(HAN)Haejoang
Field Trips Anywhere
CHO(HAN)Haejoang

낸시 가족 수업계획서 보내온 것

조한 2011.02.22 22:02 조회수 : 6112

 

ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE FAMILY*

Nancy Abelmann (nabelman@illinois.edu)

ANTH 499

Tuesday, Thursday 11-12:20 a.m., 162 Noyes

 

Wednesday 3-5, Office Hours, 418 Swanlund Administration Building

(Please reach Kelley Frazier, kdfrazie@, 333-6771 for an appointment during office hours or otherwise)

 

Anthropologists have been writing about kinship and family for a long time. We know that who counts as “family” or “kin” varies widely across place and time; and we also know that many contemporary ideas about family are quite new in a world historical sense. And, to add to the complexity, many developments in our world are changing how family and kinship work: including, new cultures of sexuality, new technologies of reproduction, new cultures of “adoption,” and extraordinary levels of family dispersion and migration. In this course we will examine some of the debates in anthropology and kindred disciplines about family, paying most attention to how anthropologists (and novelists and filmmakers) have taken on the challenge of portraying “family” and family life.

 

*I would like to acknowledge that I have taken inspiration from a syllabus created by Jason Romero (graduate student, Anthropology, U of I) on this topic.

 

Readings

 

Article will all be available as PDFs on Moodle.

 

Ordered books we will read in full:

 

Schneider,  David M. 1980 (1968). American Kinship: A Cultural Account. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

 

Ordered books we will read in (very) large part:

 

Kim, Eleana. 2010. Adopted Territory: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Politics of Belonging. Duke University Press.

 

Olwig, Karen Fog. 2007. Caribbean journeys: an ethnography of migration and home in three family networks. Duke University Press.

 

Stack, Carol. 1996. Call to Home: African Americans Reclaim the South. NY: Basic Books.

 

Stacey, Judith. 1998. Brave New Families: Stories of Domestic Upheaval in Late Twentieth Century America.  Berkeley: UC Press.

 

Ordered books we will read a selection from:

 

Carsten, Janet. 2003. After Kinship. Cambridge University Press

 

Ordered books we will not read at all:

 

Lareau, Annette. 2003 Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life. University of California Press.

 

Assignments (please note there are some differences in the assignments for graduate students and undergraduate students)

 

A. Five Reading Response “Posts” (on Moodle) (9 % each) 45% (at least two must be on the 5 major books, either the book-at-large or the selection of a particular day). These are due by midnight the night before the class in which the readings will be discussed.

 

Drawing on all of the readings that day (unless there is only one), please post a 2-3  page double spaced (no need to be longer) response in which you introduce the following (undergraduates may do this in a list; graduate students should instead attempt a synthetic essay).

 

1.  ARGUMENT: The reading/s’ central argument/s (sometimes a single, well-composed sentence is enough).

2.  EVIDENCE: What you consider to be the reading/s’ most compelling evidence (ethnographic or otherwise) mobilized in support of that argument (under 1 above). Explain how that evidence works to support the argument/s.

3. SURPRISE: Something (argumentative and/or empirical?argumentative is the more powerful) that surprised or deeply interested you (i.e., something that challenges a prior understanding you had, something that you would have previously found hard to believe etc.) (You should also indicate why you are surprised).

4. CONFIRM: Something that confirms something you already knew (i.e., something that doesn’t surprise you at all) (You should indicate why you are not surprised).

5. CURIOUS: Something you would like to know more about (you might in conjunction indicate one more cited sources (i.e., from the bibliography/ies) that intrigue you).

6. HELP: A term/phrase/idea (perhaps a theoretical construct or something idiomatic from the ethnography) that you find helpful/inspiring (You should include your understanding of the selection).

7. CONFUSE: Something that you don’t understand: this could be a term, an idea, an argument, a passage (feel free to list a page or paragraph etc.) (If you do not have something for this entry that is fine ? i.e., do not force yourself to be confused!).

8. CONNECT: Something from this reading that relates to another reading and/or discussion from the class.

 

B. 3 “Creative” Assignments (12% each) 36% (Each of these must include references to at least 3 course readings ? the references must be substantive, i.e., related to the ideas/arguments not just facts).

 

1. STORYCORPS (4-6 double spaced pages) Due Feb 17 (these will be presented in class) (you are free to do this paper with another person or in a small group).

Storycorps is, broadly speaking, an American oral history project, in the vein of the Depression era Federal Writer’s Project. All over the U.S. the project has set up phone-booth like mini recording studios in which most typically one person interviews another ? most often the interview is among intimates and the story is already known, but being recorded for posterity. They are all archived, are featured weekly on NPR, and have been collected in publications as well. Find an introduction here: http://storycorps.org/about/. And find many of the recordings here (they are each very short, edited down for public consumption): http://storycorps.org/. I think that these recordings tell us a great deal about kinship, family, intimacy, affect etc. in the U.S. today. Your job is to find a cluster (say 4-6) of these recordings that you draw upon to write a paper about any of these themes ? it should in some way touch on what we will have read/discussed by then. In class you will share your arguments/findings and perhaps a short clip or two. FYI, a few of us on campus coordinated to write a review of the first book published from Storycorps interviews: http://ohr.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/ohp050?
ijkey=lS0zDuyWD9v763B&keytype=ref
(no need to read it but you might find it interesting).

 

2. FAMILIES IN FICTION (4-6 double spaced pages) Due April1 14 (these will be presented in class) (you will do these in groups of 3-4).

 

Your group will read one of the following novels (you are free to propose another novel). You will treat the novel as “field site” and write an ethnography of the family/ies in the work. You can do/organize this any way you like, but you should, as an ethnographer would, make an argument and marshal evidence to support that argument.

 

Jeffrey Eugenides 2007. Middlesex. (I have read it: truly fascinating).

 

Marilynne Robinson. 1981. Housekeeping (I have read it: truly a 20th century feminist classic, somewhat experimental).

 

Marilynne Robinson. 2008. Home (I have read it: remarkable and remarkably painful).

 

J.D. Salinger. 1963 (#3 bestselling book that year) Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (this book combines two short stories on the Glass family (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_family for a review of other short stories that feature members of the family ? you can draw on any cluster of stories you want) (I have not read these, but plan to).

 

Yoshimoto, Banana. 1988. Kitchen (I have read it: a Japanese novel, very post-family, very interesting read).

 

3. THE PULSE ON DOUBLE-EARNER AMERICAN FAMILIES (4-6 double spaced pages) Due April 28 (these will be presented in class) (you are free to do this paper with another person or in a small group).

 

The Sloan Center on Everyday Lives of Families (CELF) is the well-funded brainchild of a linguistic anthropologist, Elinor Ochs. In their words,

CELF is an interdisciplinary center where anthropologists, applied linguists, education specialists, and psychologists study how working parents and their children approach the challenges of balancing the demands of work, school, and family life using detailed, ethnographic research of everyday life. The center has four aims:

1) detailed, ethnographic research on the home life of middle class working families

2) creation of a digital archive of everyday family life

3) providing research training opportunities for scholars of family life

4) informing public dialogue on working family life”

 

On their website you will find a list of all the working papers (and their abstracts) to have come out of this project so far (http://celf.ucla.edu/pages/working_papers2.php). Your job is to look through those, asking yourself, “If all I knew about the ‘American’ family was this ? this list of working papers -- what could I say?”

 

C.  (For undergraduates only) Author Exchange 19% Due May 5

 

In 5-7 double spaced pages please craft a meaningful/substantive (but still interesting exchange) between two of the authors of the book-length ethnographies we have read for this class. You may do this in any format you would like (a chance meeting, a debate etc.). While you may quote from the text, please keep your quotes short (i.e., phrases or ethnographic tidbits). While you will be writing from the intellectual perspective of the author, the prose should be your own. You are open to have the authors discuss a range of topics, but in any case the conversation should reflect your careful comprehension of their work. You are welcome to introduce a moderator (or other third person) for the conversation.

 

D.  (For graduate students only) Teaching Plan 15% Due May 5

                 

All graduate students will co-teach one ethnographic book with Nancy. We will conference on the book together circa one week before the first teaching day.  Please prepare a 5-7 page teaching essay for the book. The essay will likely incorporate your reflections on the experience of teaching the book (you should thus record your thoughts during/after that teaching). The essay should also reflect the book’s substance. You may introduce other materials that you think could be productive for teaching the text (fine to draw from this syllabus) and you may also reflect on how ideally you think the text should be framed in a class such as this one (or another sort of class if you would rather).

 

E. (For graduate students only) Graduate Student Readings: 4% (oral presentation only)

There are 6 “graduate student readings” on the syllabus. Each graduate student will pick one and present briefly on it (5-10 minutes, 5 is fine!) in relation to the readings of that day.

 

F. Class participation: Excellent attendance/participation (up a half grade); Poor attendance/participation (down a half grade)

 

Schedule

 

Week 1

“Kinship” Troubles in Anthropology

 

January 20

 

Collier, Jane, Michelle Z. Rosaldo and Sylvia Yanagisako. 1997.  Is There a Family?: New Anthropological Views. In Micaela Di Leonardo and Roger N. Lancaster, eds. The Gender/Sexuality Reader. New York : Routledge.  Pp. 71-81.

 

Week 2

“Kinship” Troubles in Anthropology, Continued

 

January 25

 

Schneider, David. 1972. What is Kinship All About. In Kinship Studies in the Morgan Centennial Year. Ed. Priscilla Reining. Washington, DC: Anthropological Society of Washington. Pp. 32-63

 

January 27

 

Carsten, Janet. 1995. The Substance of Kinship and the Heat of the Hearth: Feeding, Personhood, and Relatedness among Malays in Pulau Langkawi. American Ethnologist 22(2):223-241.

 

______. 2004. Introduction. In After Kinship. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 1-30.

 

Week 3

Bringing Kinship Home: Schneider on the United States

 

February 1

 

Schneider, David M. 1980 (1968). American Kinship: A Cultural Account. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

 

February 3

 

Schneider, David M. 1980 (1968). American Kinship: A Cultural Account. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

 

Weston, Kath. Families we Choose.  Selections 103-136.

 

Week 4

Other Idioms of Kinship: Family, Genealogy, Intimacy

 

February 8

 

Giddens, Anthony. 2000. “Family.” In Runaway World: How Globalization Is Reshaping Our Lives. New York: Routledge. Pp. 69-84.[na1] 

 

Borovoy, Amy. 2005. The Inescapable Discourse of Motherhood. In The Too-Good Family: Alcohol, Codependency, and the Politics of Nurturance in Postwar Japan. Berkeley: UC Press. 137-160.

 

 

 

 

Graduate Student Reading 1

Rose, Nikolas. 1990. The Responsible Autonomous Family. Governing the Soul: The Shaping of the Private Self. NY: Routledge. Pp. 205-213. [have PDF]

 

February 10

 

Povinelli, Elizabeth A. 2002. Notes on Gridlock: Genealogy, Intimacy, Sexuality. Public Culture 14(1):215.

Week 5

 Audio/visual Family

 

February 15

 

Bouquet, Mary. 2001. Making Kinship, with an Old Reproductive Technology. In Relative Values: Reconfiguring Kinship Studies. Ed. Sarah Franklin and Susan McKinnon. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Pp. 85-115.

 

Hirsch, Marianne. 1997. Selection from “Reframing the Human Family Romance” in Family Frames: Photography, Narrative, and Postmemory.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Pp. 48-67.

 

February 17

 

STORYCORPS in-class presentations (and paper due-date).

 

Week 6

“Family” Amidst New Technologies/Biologies

 

February 22

 

Finkler, Kaja. 2005.Family, Kinship, Memory and Temporality in the Age of the New Genetics. Social Science & Medicine 61(5): 1059-1071.

 

Graduate Student Reading 2

 

Rapp, Rayna, Deborah Health, and Karen-Sue Taussig. 2001. Genealogical Dis-ease: Where Hereditary Abnormality, Biomedical Explanation, and Family Responsibility Meet. In Sarah Franklin and Susan McKinnon eds., Relative Values: Reconfiguring Kinship Studies. Durham: Duke University Press. Pp. 384-409.

 

February 24

 

Thompson, Charis. 2001. Strategic Naturalizing: Kinship in an Infertility Clinic. In Sarah Franklin and Susan McKinnon eds., Relative Values: Reconfiguring Kinship Studies. Durham: Duke University Press. Pp. 175-202.

  

                     OR (half of class will read one, half the other)

 

Hargreaves, Katrina. 2006. Constructing families and kinship through donor insemination. Sociology of Health & Illness 28 (3): 261-283.

 

Graduate Student Reading 3

 

Edwards, Jeanette and Marilyn Strathern. 2000. Including Our Own. In Janet Carsten, ed. (ed.) Cultures of Relatedness: New Approaches to the Study of Kinship. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 149-166.

 

Week 7

“Family/Kinship” Ethnography I

 

March 1

 

Stack, Carol. 1996. Call to Home: African Americans Reclaim the South. NY: Basic Books. xi-106.

 

March 3

 

Stack, Carol. 1996. Call to Home: African Americans Reclaim the South. NY: Basic Books. Pp. 122-199.

 

To Sleep with Anger (film on reserve in undergraduate library)

 

Week 8

The Adoption Lens on Kinship and Family

 

                  March 8

 

Gailey, Christine. 2000. Ideologies of Motherhood and Kinship in U.S. Adoption. In Ideologies and Technologies of Motherhood: Race, Class, Sexuality, Nationalism. Helena Ragone and France Winddance Twine, eds. NY: Routledge. Pp. 11-55.

 

Graduate Student Reading 4

 

Strong, Pauline Turner. 2001. To Forget Their Tongue, Their Name, and Their Whole Relation: Captivity, Extra-Tribal Adoption, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. In Sarah Franklin and Susan McKinnon eds., Relative Values: Reconfiguring Kinship Studies. Durham: Duke University Press. Pp 468-493.

 

                  March 10

 

                                   In class film: First Person Plural

 

Eng, David. 2010. The Language of Kinship: Translational Adoption and Two Mothers in First Person Plural. In The Feeling of Kinship: Queer Liberalism and the Racialization of Intimacy. Durham: Duke University Press. Pp. 93-137.

 

Week 9

“Family/Kinship” Ethnography II + Adoption, cont.

 

March 15

 

Kim, Eleana. 2010. Adopted Territory: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Politics of Belonging. Duke University Press. Introduction, chapters 2, and 3.

 

March 17

 

Kim, Eleana. 2010. Adopted Territory: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Politics of Belonging. Duke University Press. Chapters 4, 5, and 7.

 

SPRING BREAK!! (ENJOY!!)

 

Week 10

Narrative/Space

 

March 29

 

Bruner, Jerome B. 1990. Autobiography and Self (selection). In Acts of Meaning.  Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Pp. 116-138.

 

Ossman, Susan. 2001. This Week in the Blue Room: Locating Kinship in a Split-Level House. In James D. Faubion, ed. The Ethics of Kinship: Ethnographic Inquiries. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. Pp. 178-193.

 

March 31

 

  FAMILIES IN FICTION work day (Paper/presentation due April 14)

 

Week 11

Transnational Family/

“Family/Kinship” Ethnography III

 

April 5

 

Ong, Aihwa. 1999. The Pacific Shuttle: Family Citizenship and Capital Circuits. In Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality. Durham: Duke University Press. Pp .110-136.

 

Manalansan, Martin F. IV. 2003. The Biyuti and Drama of Everyday Life. In Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 89-125.

 

 

 

 

 

April 7

 

Olwig, Karen Fog. 2007. Caribbean Journeys: An Ethnography of Migration and Home in Three Family Networks. Durham: Duke University Press. Introduction (all), Part 1, 2, or 3 (I will divide the class).

 

Graduate Student Reading 5

 

                Parre?as, Rhacel Salazar. 2005. Long Distance Intimacy: Class, Gender and Intergenerational Relations Between Mothers and Children in Filipino Transnational Families. Global Networks 5(4): 317-336. [Have PDF]

 

Week 12

“Family/Kinship” Ethnography III

Novel Families

 

April 12

Olwig, Karen Fog. 2007. Caribbean Journeys: An Ethnography of Migration and Home in Three Family Networks. Durham: Duke University Press. Part 4.

 

Graduate Student Reading 6

 

­­                Wilding, Raelene. 2006. 'Virtual' Intimacies? Families Communicating Across Transnational Contexts. Global Networks 6(2):125-142.

 

April 14

 

FAMILIES IN FICTION in-class presentations (and paper due-date).

 

Week 13

“Family/Kinship” Ethnography IV

 

                  April 19

                                                    

Stacey, Judith. 1998. Brave New Families: Stories of Domestic Upheaval in Late Twentieth Century America.  Berkeley: UC Press. Preface, Prologue, Chapters 1 and 2.

 

                  April 21 

 

Family Project (documentary in class).

 

Week 14

“Family/Kinship” Ethnography IV

                 

April 26

 

Stacey, Judith. 1998. Brave New Families: Stories of Domestic Upheaval in Late Twentieth Century America.  Berkeley: UC Press. Book 1 or Book 2 (I will divide the class).

 

April 28

 

THE PULSE ON DOUBLE-EARNER AMERICAN FAMILIES in-class presentations (and paper due-date).

 

Week 15

 

                  May 3

 

Stacey, Judith. 1998. Brave New Families: Stories of Domestic Upheaval in Late Twentieth Century America.  Berkeley: UC Press. Chapter 11.

 

 


 [na1]Kelley please get rid of hanging indent